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Author Topic: [Art Pricing Discussion]Industry vs Fandom  (Read 3208 times)

Offline Ridia

[Art Pricing Discussion]Industry vs Fandom
«: January 27, 2012, 07:23:27 AM»
Based on a post making rounds through Tumblr: http://bambicandi.tumblr.com/post/15128539107/pricelists-industry-vs-fandom-finally-made

The tumblr post is about the drastic differences between Industry Standard and Fandom Prices for art. Below is my input on the topic.

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Because I’m a goddamn dork like that, I figured this up assuming 300 dpi for those sizes (divide pixels by resolution to get inches). I multiplied length by width to figure square inches. I suck at math, so watch me be kinda wrong here, but it’s fairly eye-opening.

Spread [3508x4961px] [11.693x16.54in] [193.40222 sq in]
BW: $500-$1,500 = $2.59 - $7.76 p/sq in
COLOR: $700-$2,000 = $3.62 - $10.34 p/sq in

Full Page [2480x3508px] [11.693x8.26in] [96.58418 sq in]
BW: $500 - $9,500 = $5.18 - $98.36 p/sq in
COLOR: $500-$1,500 = $5.18 - $15.53 p/sq in

Quarter Page [620x877px] [2.07x2.93 in] [6.065 sq in]
BW: $100-$350 = $16.49 - $57.84 p/sq in
COLOR: $200-$400 = $32.97 - $65.95 p/sq in

FANDOM AVERAGE
Spread [3508x4961px] [11.693x16.54in] [193.40222 sq in]
BW: $10-$50 =  $0.06 - $0.26 p/sq in
COLOR: $50-$200 $0.26 - $1.03 p/sq in

Full Page [2480x3508px] [11.693x8.26in] [96.58418 sq in]
BW: $5-$30 = $0.05 - $0.31 p/sq in
COLOR: $20-$70 = $0.21 - $0.72 p/sq in

Quarter Page [620x877px] [2.07x2.93 in] [6.065 sq in]
BW: $5-$30 = $0.82 - $4.95 p/sq in
COLOR: $10-$30 = $1.65 - $4.95 p/sq in

[******* NOTE: Furcadia portraits, assuming 72 DPI, are about 1.3194 repeating on either side, so look at the per-square-inch prices and assume around 2-or-less if you're curious how this stacks up against portrait prices.]

‘Why are the Fandom Prices So Low’?

There are a few factors on this that I can think of off the top of my head. First, not knowing the value of their work is one that a lot of us, including myself, are guilty of.

However, the purpose and use of the commissioned artwork are a matter that a lot of people seem to overlook in the discussions I’ve seen. This can sometimes come down to being a matter of our friend © - copyrights.

What do you mean ‘copyrights’?

Copyright law in many nations places ownership of the created artwork with the artist from the moment of its creation. This is a right that, in many nations, can be transferred, sold, or licensed. In non-commercial commissions, the commissioner will generally only really want to display, print, and show off the piece of artwork that they have purchased. The majority of commissioners online do not have commercial intents nor knowledge of how to use the images they receive commercially.

Many fandom artists also do not create or post artwork that is particularly suitable for commercial printing. This is not a broad, sweeping statement saying that everyone doesn’t, but freelance fandom artists will usually make an image however big they want, or however big it needs to be, especially in digital medium as opposed to traditional. Some digital artists don’t use an appropriate dpi for high-quality printing.

As an artist, I explicitly state that I retain the copyright to the artwork created in the commission, and that the commissioner is granted a license to display, upload, edit, and any other personal, private, non-commercial use. I do not currently do any ‘work made for hire’ as this by-default delegates the copyright of your creation to your employer, as if they were the creator and not you.

Back to my main topic. Copyrights effect the price of the work because the commissioner/employer in many professional and commercial situations is purchasing rights to do things with your work, including display, publish, transmit, and otherwise use and profit from the use of your work, such as in using it in advertising. Rather than royalties or some such, you get paid off in the initial price tag. The key here is that the work is being used commercially. Your work is intended to be displayed to your commissioner’s target audience and used as a tool to help better their business and increase their income, or perhaps your work is a part of their product somehow. This is why industry standard is so much higher than fandom, on top of fandom artists selling themselves short.

‘What about affordability?’

This is one of the major reasons my prices took a nosedive recently. As a fandom artist, your customer is most likely going to be an average person with an average or below average income. This is something that needs to be taken into account when considering pricing of commissions. How much could someone comfortably pay for something that will likely end up a file on their hard drive, posted on their website, or hung up on their wall? Being affordable will draw more people to you, but at the same time it has the disadvantage of making less money on average than a minimum wage job.

‘Should I Raise My Prices?’

Probably. Even without commercial use being an issue, fandom artists are shooting themselves in the foot from the looks of it. I’m going to raise my own prices, but I won’t expect to get industry standard prices for non-commercial work. I will be looking towards standardizing the sizes of my commissions, and setting a price that I feel is fair for my time, effort and skill for non-commercial work.


tl;dr version:
-Industry Standard is A Metric Fuckton of $
-Fandom Artists barely charge a fraction of that
-Most Fandom Artists make vastly less than minimum wage per hour for their work
-The reason Industry is so much higher than Fandom comes down to copyrights licensing.

Quote
Almost NO ONE on this site charges a reasonable amount for their work - the vast majority undercharge to the point that it is ridiculous. This gives commissioners the expectation of getting something for virtually nothing and honestly is not a trend that should continue.

Self-respect, folks. Get some.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2012, 02:57:59 PM by Ridia »

 
        

Offline Ridia

Re: Industry vs Fandom
«Reply #1: February 03, 2012, 01:54:09 PM»
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._minimum_wages#Federal 
This link shows USA minimum wages for 2012. If you live in the US, I suggest charging no less than 1 hour worth of  federal minimum wage for a portrait.

Offline Varns

Re: Industry vs Fandom
«Reply #2: May 23, 2017, 01:37:03 PM»
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._minimum_wages#Federal 
This link shows USA minimum wages for 2012. If you live in the US, I suggest charging no less than 1 hour worth of  federal minimum wage for a portrait.

What is the minimum wage in 2017? I think you could probably charge quite a bit more than 1 hours worth of minimum wage right for a portrait.