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Author Topic: Common Courtesy  (Read 4511 times)

Offline Tate

Common Courtesy
«: June 19, 2008, 09:03:30 PM»
This world lacks it. Severely.

This topic is about: Where do you live? How do people treat each other, there, in public? In private? Family? Etc.?

Me? I love in America. In a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

People here, as a general rule, ignore each others' presence. They could care less that you exist, unless you do something to them. If you do something to them? They make some snarky comment, and, if the thing was bad enough, might seek you out later and hit you from behind. No, this behavior isn't reserved to teenagers.

In privacy, with your friends, people are generally very verbally and mentally abusive to each other. Always, one must one-up the others, always lying to make oneself look better than is true. Everything that is said beyond the first few exchanges can surely be treated as an untruth, and not be given value.

Families here generally aren't much better, by my observations. The average family composes of stepchildren and, in accordance, step parents. That, or single parents. Either way, everyone once more must continually one-up each other--the parents are not exempt, and are indeed active participants. It is very rare for closeness to occur, and almost as rare to see a family sitting together, even for something as common as dinner (breakfast and lunch can not even be considered).

Of course, relations go much deeper than this, but I am merely explaining the ever common surface.

A personal story of such treatments and lack of courtesy is easily found every day in my home. Any time I, and sometimes my little brothers (though less commonly them, as they do not belong to my father), am in a room with my father, it usually ends in him thrusting some piece of his garbage, or some dirty plait at me, without so much as a "thank you", or even, "can you toss this out for me?".

I shouldn't have to stop to explain to him, "'Can you throw this out for me' is not a directive--it is a common courtesy." I wouldn't expect to see anyone treat even the waitress of some dirty restaurant to be treated in such a better-than-you way, let alone one's own daughter. It's actually disgusting, at this point, that he could treat me, or anyone else, like that.

Yes, this is a little bit of a rant on my behalf-but it is an honest conversation to be had. I would really like to see if this is something common in you all's homes, or if I simply seem to live in some heathen-like society. I would especially like to hear a foreigner's view on this, and see the contrast, if there is any, in our lives.

 
        

Offline Azula

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #1: June 19, 2008, 09:31:16 PM»
i used to live in las vegas.

i now live in los angeles.

end of story.

Offline Asiil

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #2: June 22, 2008, 01:23:02 AM»
I would have to agree that common courtesy is...lacking...in places. Not just in your city. The town that I grew up in was really big on two genre's. The church-going 'goody two-shoes' and the pregnant/gangster high-school dropout. If you didn't go to church, you were expected to drop out or get pregnant before graduation. I have no idea if it's toned down since then, though I certainly hope it has.

And because my family reared me and my brother under a church-going pretense it put me in the position of acting the way I don't want to act (as a fraud, in essence). Southern Baptists are very, VERY adament about certain things. Namely their so-called 'conversion' rate. Most of the Baptist churches (or even Methodist for that matter) like to take their youths on little excursions and convince them that their way is right. It's to the point that you sit in a crowd of moaning, hand-flailing, weepy children and young-adults, cringing because you are the only one not buying into it for a second. And if you aren't all red-eyed by the end of that weekend, they do the "next best thing" and have a sit down with your parents to make them fork over more money as a "donation to the church" and send us out on another excursion to try again.

It reaches a point after the third or fourth "adventure" that one either truly 'sees the light' or just breaks under peer pressure. Conformity is their greatest ally and they use it through emotional response.

When did it become right for a church to practically become a dictatorship? Last I understood, America was still a free-religion country, right? Since when is it common courtesy to pressure an individual into doing what the other teens at the establishment are doing?

That's why I like agnosticism. Nobody's right, and nobody's wrong, and I remain free to choose my own road.
I reject your reality and replace it with my own.



Sesruc

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #3: June 27, 2008, 10:07:34 AM»
people will act they way they are grown up around. if they grow up in a violent and brash environment that lacks common courtesy, you can't expect too much differently from them.

i live in a good neighborhood, i've been raised around really good kids and adults, and i've learned to ignore the idiots. i'm nice to others, others are nice to me.

i live in a city only a few miles from boston. other than the bad drivers, people will pay as much attention to you as you pay to them - nothing. boston is an obvious melting pot and everyone accepts each other from what i see.

my family is good to me as i am to them. sure, there are arguments and tense moments as usual but we're cool. there are families of all sorts here also. people with stepchildren, stepfathers, mothers, the average stitched together family, etc.

religion is yours to take or accept. no one will penalize you for anything.

Offline Lord

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #4: July 01, 2008, 03:56:41 AM»
i live in illinois

have for my entire life

only moved once, and that was about two miles away from my old home

gone to the same schools, same places, same everything my entire life

i dont really think ive honestly seen one courteouswtfever person in my entire life

my mother brought me up by using her own friends as bad examples, as well as random people on the street, and pointing out -everyones- flaws so i wouldnt 'turn out like them'.

my father wouldnt hold a civil tongue when i was in the room, at young ages, and he was angry. he would swear at video games, with me laying on the couch next to him, which brought me to believe that swearing was okay. then when i said 'damn' i got my mouth washed out with soap and led to me having a confused mindset

sarcasm reigns supreme everywhere. people talk behind EVERYONES back, whether they know the person theyre talking about or not. and people really arent joking when they say you have to 'outperform' everyone in a job interview. i dont think we neccesarily have anything SPECIFIC for our region.

neighbors arent 'neighborly'. if you try to knock on one of their doors and say a friendly 'hi, welcome to the neighborhood', they'll shut the door in your face and try to poison your cat (yeah, literally. my cat almost died)

those neighbors that arent mean old cooped-up shits, are really old, but nice. the bad thing? they all die uhm. within a year of meeting them. or go to old people homes and their grandsons/granddaughters who happen to be the street slut takes over the house and ruins the neighborhood.

uhgggg theres more but im xtremely tired

Offline Sync

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #5: July 01, 2008, 06:10:13 AM»
i live in TN.

gotta say it isn't that bad where i live. i always start conversations with random people in stores, though i live in the nicer part of town. go downtown and it's black haters and kids dying all over the place.

ohboy.

Offline Ean

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #6: July 04, 2008, 04:34:41 PM»
I used to live there, Tachs. >: For about... six months. I'm in Texas now.

Offline Kenshii

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #7: August 10, 2008, 12:59:14 AM»
I will tell you..I was in culture shock when I moved to America.

From where I am from, Akita..it's normal to smile or wave to a stranger. It is common to bow or say thank you to someone who opens a door for you, or moves out of your way. Small things like that. I mean..the worse that can happen is if you get stared at for doing something odd, or being a foreigner.

As for home life there, like many other countries around Japan such as China and Korea and Indonesia, filiality (the act of being filial, aka obedient) to your parents is a HUGE thing. I nearly died of shock when I came to America to see kids mouth off to the parents, curse at the parents and even HIT their parents. Back home? That would not have happened. Even if your parents are overbearing, you have to listen to them because they are your parents, and in the end to be filial is to have good karma.

Currently living in the Midwest..I have met very nice strangers to the meanest. I have had people almost knock me over and not even say sorry, I have seen kids throw things at their parents in the stores. It's a shock. I am in NO WAY saying my home country is better than America. Its just difference in culture.



Offline Jenni

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #8: August 10, 2008, 01:24:26 AM»
Even if this is a slightly old thread, I can agree with what Kenshii's saying, because my mother is from Japan and is always blown away at how rude some of the people in this country are. She's always talking about how, even the drivers in Japan, would respect those around them and people were grown up in a sort of environment where you are to respect your elders. My mother got punished if she disobeyed or talked back to her parents or her grandpa and was thickly taught to be respectful and nice to anyone, even a stranger. She was telling me about how people are always 'after you', instead of being impatient or rude and doing what they want to do, disregarding those around them.

She even tells me to be kind and respectful, saying my 'thank you sir/ma'ams' and plenty of other stuff. But yeah, when it comes to respect, the US and Japan are very different. My mom's probably - no, IS - the nicest person in my household. She doesn't fight, at all. She walks out and avoids it, and if she's angry, instead of being mean, she'll put you on the silent treatment. And let me tell you, it's hell... because I love my mommy. ;_; So it forces me to apologize.

SO YES, JUST REITERATING WHAT KENSHII SAID BECAUSE OF MY MOM.

Offline Mredria

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #9: August 10, 2008, 11:30:52 AM»
I grew up in Texas and now when I visit other states I'm a little shocked. In Texas if you make eye contact with someone, you at least nod or wave, and sometimes say good morning, even to strangers. I feel like sometimes in Houston that's going out the window, but a lot of people still do it. Other places people look at me like I'm a little crazy if I smile or talk to them.
It's kind of funny because if you don't greet someone in some manner here in Texas, people probably think "Jeez, what's that lady's problem" but when you're somewhere where that's not common and you greet someone they're probably thinking "Jeez, can't that lady mind her own business?"
Touching on what Kenshii said too, I too am sometimes surprised at how kids treat their parents. In my family (my mother's side are ranchers, and my father's side are also ranchers and Mexican American) you always obey your parents. When I was a kid I wasn't to talk when adults were talking, I said my "thank you, your welcome"s and my "yes sir, no sir"s, and otherwise kept my head down around my parents and around adults. It really comes to a shock to me, when I see people screaming at their parents or children throwing things at them. It's not so much that I think that it's better or worse, I'm just shocked when I see it and think "omg. If I ever did that, I would be DEAD".
---I apologize---

Offline Hyorin

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #10: August 11, 2008, 08:47:39 AM»
I live in Etobicoke, Canada, which is too close to Toronto to really be considered a suburb. My neighbourhood is mostly filled with old people, families, rich teenagers, and Ukrainians. (Ukrainians are the reason we live here. My family is almost pure Ukrainian, so we tend to stick with our people.)

When we moved here, the neighbours came to our door with cake and we gave them a tour of the house. We do the same when others move in. Exempting the rich teenagers who only actually come here in the summer to throw parties, everyone here is very nice and courteous. It's a very dog friendly neighbourhood and when I walk my dog and come across someone else, even if they're total strangers, we can find something to talk about. There's a park down the street and it has a playground, pool, tennis court, full of kids and parents and picnics. And there are of course Ukrainians living in every second house, which means they are constantly inviting you over for barbecues, dessert, or lordy knows what other occasions they can think of.

I think it might be because of the area we live in. It's a well-developed area and families are attracted to it because of the park, the proximity to the city, etc. We have no problem with common courtesy here (aside from the rich teenagers, but they're easily ignored). I've been all over Ontario and I've never met people that were really downright rude (although there are some shabby areas where people don't really communicate to eachother, but I didn't find this rude as much as maybe just liking their privacy?). But then again I was raised to put manners first, and I tend to smile and open doors to strangers a lot, and I haven't really been in a situation where I was nice to someone and they were rude back.

Let's see. What other places have I been to.

I was in Ukraine and everyone there was tooth rotting sweet. My family there lives in poverty but they're always giving free candy to kids, and hosting huge dinners and being so nice it just makes you all gooey inside-- okay.
My family goes to Cuba about every year or so, it's kind of a tradition. People there are fun loving. They're kind of rude, but in a snappy, joking sort of way. They make fun of tourists but you know they don't mean it and they're friendly. They are polite, but so much that it wows you.
The two times I went to the States I went to Pennsylvania and Florida. I didn't really talk to any of the strangers there though - my parents mostly take us to the States for shopping, so we literally spent 12 hours shopping one day, and then sped home. I think all the people there were other Canadians shopping too, so I can't really make a judgement on that. :P
And I've been to Quebec before, my last trip was in June in fact with my friends. In the city (Upper Town specifically), the people there were actually kind of rude. Most of them were French and when I spoke with them they could tell that I was a tourist because my French didn't have that... accent I guess? Not sure. Lower Town was great though and across the St. Lawrence river people are REALLY nice, even to tourists.

Okay. I typed way too much. Okay. Sorry. x)

Offline happyknot

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #11: August 24, 2008, 05:28:20 AM»
It was very interesting reading all of these posts from people and cultures of so many different cities. I myself live in Windsor, Ontario ~ close enough to Detroit to see it's sky line from virtually all over my city.

I find that courtesy is shown randomly and situationally. If I sneeze 7/10 someone near by will say "bless you". No one hesitates if I ask a stranger to help me get something down from a high shelf in a store. About 60% whoever walks in front of me will hold the door open for me as they walk through, 9/10 if I hold the door open for strangers they will smile or thank me.

The odds of a stranger telling the bus driver to wait for someone they see running down the road are less than 50% but it still happens sometimes. I myself have called the police several times on behalf of a neighbor who was being beat by this guy that she kept letting in.

More than 75% of the time drivers won't slow down if I am crossing the street when it's my turn. I'v ebeen clipped several times and hit when I was riding my bike. I have seen an old lady cut off a cop when leaving the Wal-Mart parking lot. Courtesy isn't common when driving.

~*~

Still a lot of abuse happens around here as well as crime.
From what I have witnessed people are just as happy to take advantage of someone weaker than them as they are to help them.
My DA Hope begins in the dark, the stubborn hope that if you just show up and try to do the right thing, the dawn will come. You wait and watch and work: You don't give up. ~ Anne Lamott

Offline Tycho

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #12: September 02, 2008, 01:05:32 PM»
I lived in Chicago for 7 months after living in Wisconsin most of my life.

In Wisconsin, part I'm from, you hold open doors for people, smile, and tell them to have a good day -- even if you don't know them.

In Chicago, you hold open a door for someone and they wait to see what you want from them. Or walk in backwards so you don't knife them in the back. :E

It's disconcerting, really. and disheartening that I can't be myself in a big city like that. I'm usually a really nice person when I'm out in public; I'll pick up something someone dropped for them, give directions if I know where they're going, or smile and start a conversation with someone that looks down or alone. In Chicago I had to COMPLETELY re-design who I was and how I acted, otherwise I was weird, or different, or a threat that people had to act hostile towards.

 :(

Offline Sorbet

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #13: October 06, 2008, 02:43:39 PM»
I try my very best to be nice to others, even when they don't deserve it or treat me with the same respect.
I'm always opening doors for people/holding doors open, letting people in in traffic, saying please and thank you, bless you, etc.
It's all about treating others how you would like to be treated. Plus, being nice is good for your health. :P

Offline Asyd

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #14: October 20, 2008, 07:36:03 PM»
i live in a waywayway small town in Iowa.  everyone here is basically old...oldoldoldoldoldold + some kids. it has no stores...and we don't even have a gas station loloolll...oh wait yea...well we do..i guess ..we have two pumps on a random square by the highwayy?!  i've lived here since i was three months old, and most of these old people demand respect haha...and since i never really got out of town much (we are in the middle of nowhere) i never got used to being around so many people.  considering my elementary class here in town (up to 5th) i was in a class of about 15..? somewhere around there.  i don't remember any drama, obv..its elementary. i'm nice, people here are nice to me..kinda-sorta still, they got crabbier and older as i became a teen idk.  once i got into highschool (have to drive so many miles everyday to get there T__T) i was astounded by peoples lack of common courtesy, but after a while i just got accustomed to the the fact thats how it was outside my town and around so many people.  i'm still nice to everyone, but not everyone is nice to me.  my highschool is full of drama and luckily i never get caught into any of it, i didn't make much other friends then the ones i grew up with...too many people at my school are sobs. and yeaaaah. idk. lol 
i am r kelly

Offline Adielle

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #15: November 04, 2008, 11:35:56 PM»
I lived in Chicago for 7 months after living in Wisconsin most of my life.
In Wisconsin, part I'm from, you hold open doors for people, smile, and tell them to have a good day -- even if you don't know them.

Yay, another Wisconsinite.  I actually lived in a suburb of Milwaukee most of my life until three years ago when I moved to Australia to be with my husband.  I'd done my fair share of travel and I must agree with Noah, out of all the big cities and various other places I have visited in the US, Wisconsin may be bland and boring, but at least people are friendly.  Everyone is fairly genuine and helpful.

Now I live in Sydney, Australia.  Its definitely better then most of the large cities in the US, but depending on where you go you can still get that whole "you don't exist" vibe.  Most places, people are friendly.  The other day on the train and older man fell getting on and I got up to help him as did another woman.  We chatted for a bit afterwards until we reached our stop.  On another occassion I had seen (but was too far away to help) a woman slip on water near a fish shop in the shopping center.  It was the shops fault and yet not ONE passerby or shop assistant came out to even politely ask if the person was okay.  So, to me, Sydney is a bit of everything, just depends on where you are.  There are certain suburbs that are friendlier then others and certain areas that are much more like what you'd see in Chicago or LA.

While I haven't been to Brisbane and the Gold Coast yet (I will be there over Christmas to stay with Seelie), I've heard wonderful thing about the people compared to those in Sydney.  Apparently its a much friendlier atmosphere.  But then again, I think, in general, country folk and people who live in small towns and suburbs tend to be more friendly compared to people who live in big cities.  I'll have to see what its like there when I go to visit Seelie.
Goodbye my Sunshine, for we are but smoke and ash...

My Gallery.

Offline Drug

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #16: December 14, 2008, 02:24:37 PM»
That's why I love Texas.

If you walk into a small-business store, they'll say, "HOW ARE YOOOOU DOIN'?! :DD" And even fast food restaurants will say, "Welcome to Cici's Pizza!" or what have you. It's expected for people to hold open the door for others, and to grin/wave at people walking down the street. In fact, it's uncommon to ignore everyone with your head tucked down.

Yep!

I'm the classic example of the small town Texas girl moving to a big city. My city is in New Jersey, 15 mins from New York City. :D Born and raised in Texas, moved to NJ about 5 months ago.

I'm one of those workers who had to greet people. I remember getting drunk with my friends and going to bed at 4am and waking up to be at work at 7am. Still a little drunk, and of course, pissed that I'm there at the crack of dawn. Old ladies pour into the store seemingly yelling, "GOOOD MORNIN'". God forbid if you don't tell them good morning back. Yeeeah.

It's true with the stereotyping. Texans are super polite. I shock people over here with my "Yes ma'am"s, "No sir"'s. And they get laughs from my "Ya'll"s.

NJ people are pretty rude. But the thing I can't get over is their cussing. xD In Texas, it's considered rude to cuss infront of other people. I remember this old lady from my work complaining that young people talk so badly to each other. She hates when we call each other stupid or retarded, even if we're just playing. Here, people cuss all the time. Even workers.. infront of customers and especially vice versa. They even cuss at me. It's like daaaamn. In Tx, we got in trouble if we cussed infront of customers because they would tell on us.  :(

Neighborly-wise, it's completely different. In Texas, everyone has houses with yards. You only have 2 real neighbors so you usually either love them or hate them. You don't necessarily have to know them either. Here, houses are soooo close together.. literally 5-6ft apart if that. And they're like apartments cause theres usually 2-3 sections per house for 2 or 3 families. Sooo, that's what, 9 neighbors?  :D You can't really help but to interact with them. Parking is usually an issue, and when they're in your house, it's hard not to get close to them.

I can go on and on, but I'll cut myself off here. If I were to sum it up in a TLDR, I'd say NJ mean, TX nice. NJ fun, TX boring.

PS: The biggest difference IMO, driving here is insane. There's crazy honking and cutting off and squeezing between parked cars. I miss those big open roads.  :P


Offline MT

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Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #17: December 14, 2008, 07:42:54 PM»
I was raised in new york city for a big part of my childhood, and after me and my family having a few bad experiences, I learned not to trust strangers and always kept my distance. Now we moved to a small boring town in Connecticut and only go to the city every weekend or so (Not much anymore though :(). In this town everyone's still an asshole so I fit in pretty quickly aha.
BUT I like to travel alot and when I went to places like Texas and Canada, everyone was sooo nice and polite. I was almost shocked since I don't think I've ever really been in a environment where I don't have to worry if my purse is slightly out of my line of vision. I would totally move to Canada :P

Offline Mala

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #18: December 15, 2008, 12:29:20 AM»
I was raised in new york city for a big part of my childhood, and after me and my family having a few bad experiences, I learned not to trust strangers and always kept my distance. Now we moved to a small boring town in Connecticut and only go to the city every weekend or so (Not much anymore though :(). In this town everyone's still an asshole so I fit in pretty quickly aha.
BUT I like to travel alot and when I went to places like Texas and Canada, everyone was sooo nice and polite. I was almost shocked since I don't think I've ever really been in a environment where I don't have to worry if my purse is slightly out of my line of vision. I would totally move to Canada :P

be wary of canadian hockey mothers.

man oh man can they bitch or what.

Offline Anevay

Re: Common Courtesy
«Reply #19: December 16, 2008, 04:04:57 AM»
I've pretty much seen the best of both worlds.
I grew up in Staten Island, New York.

Too much to say here, but I'll try to make it short. There, if it's within your own neighborhood and you get around a lot, people are amazingly friendly. (Shocker, right?) Especially the Italians! We love to just laugh and joke around with you in the supermarket lines and such. As a kid in school, I was bullied a whole bunch, but to even it out I still had a lot of great friends. I remember one time when I had this red mesh backpack with rainbow straps- a girl in my class who didn't like me saw a metal harry potter bookmark in the shape of a quill that I had at the bottom of the book bag and decided to go to the principal and tell him I was carrying a knife. >__>

So here I am, this little sixth grader, getting escorted to some secret meeting room behind the office by three security officers, just because some girl didn't like me for no reason whatsoever. In all honesty, it was too long ago for me to remember- but I'll tell you for sure, I hated that school. xD I only stayed in it for a year before we moved to the Poconoes.

It really just depended on the neighborhood you lived in and the school you went to. For example, in my class I was the one out of two caucasian kids, and the rest were either african-american or hispanic. I think a lot of the kids, as young as they were, were so influenced by their olders peers and just the project/gang-revolving community they grew up in that they were brainwashed into thinking some people weren't worth their time-- or it was cool to be asses to them, etc.

So, through a series of events, I now live in the middle of bumf***, South Dakota.
The people out here are pretty nice, the only thing I don't like is the desolation. I visit my hometown in NY twice a year, though, to fill that hole back up in my heart. x33

And this little widget I have pretty much perfectly describes the people and culture of South Dakota. Plus, it's just downright funny. xD (Footnotes included to show just how much I don't fit in around here! 8D)
________________________ _______________________


    • During a storm you check the cattle before you check the kids.
    • You are related to more than half the town.
    • You can tell the difference between a horse and a cow from a distance.
    • Your car breaks down outside of town and news of it reaches back to town before you do.
    • You don't put too much effort into hairstyles due to wind and weather.
    • Your quarterback is hurt and you're hoping it's the first thing on the 6 o'clock news.
    • There's a tornado warning and the whole town is outside watching for it. (They're so fun to watch. x3)
    • The local gas station sells live bait.
    • You don't buy all your vegetables at the grocery store. (Nope. Tomatoes and corn are a waste of money ._. I hate husking corn.)
    • You go to the State Fair for your family vacation. (Heck yes. <_<)
    • You get up at 5:30 a.m. and go down to the coffee shop.
    • You're on a first name basis with the county sheriff. (Tee-hee. His name is Brink. ;3)
    • When little smokies are something you serve on special occasions. (Nasty things. Uergh.)
    • You go to the river because it's almost like going to the ocean.
    • You have the number of the Co-op on speed dial.
    • All your radio preset buttons are country. (Not mine! Good god.)
    • Using the elevator involved a corn truck. (The elevator processes the corn kernels into ethanol, for those of you who don't know.)
    • Your mayor is also your garbage hauler, barber, and insurance salesman. (I think our town is too small for a mayor. xD But now I wonder...)
    • You know you should listen to the weather forecast before picking out an outfit.
    • You are walking knee-deep in snow. (Right now there's a four-foot snow drift blocking my driveway =|)
    • You call the wrong number and talk to the person for an hour anyway. (So annoying -.-)
    • Your excuse for getting out of school is that the cows got out. (Happens quite a bit.)
    • You talk with a friend about some big event you are going to attend, and by the end of the conversation you've decided you're both too broke to go. (Many, many time.)
    • You know cow pies aren't made of beef.
    • Your early morning prayer covers rain, cattle and pigs. (For some people >_>)
    • You wake up when it's dark and go to bed when it's still light. (On the contrary, I'm an insomniac.)
    • You consider a romantic evening driving through Hardees and renting a hunting instructional video.
    • You want to buy manure. (o_____O)
    • You listen to "Paul Harvey" every day at noon. (Every morning driving, too. But now it's Paul Harvey, Jr. =( I dunno where the Sr. went, he probably kicked the bucket ._.)
    • You can tell it's a farmer working late in his field and not a UFO. (Lol.)
    • Your nearest neighbor is in the next area code.
    • You leave your snow tires on year-round.
    • You know the difference between field corn and sweet corn when they are still on the stalk.
    • You know the code names for everyone on the CB.
    • You pick up all the free stuff at the State Fair. (And Career fairs for school. WOOH, FREE PENS. <3)
    • You'll skip your cousin's funeral for the first day of deer season.
    • You can eat an ear of corn with no utensils in under 20 seconds. (Mom could. >_>)
    • You don't clean up the dog's mess because it's just fertilizer.
    • You wear your irrigation boots to church. (*facepalm*)
    • You know enough to get your driving done early on Sundays before the Sunday drivers come out.
    • It takes 30 seconds to reach your destination and it's clear across town.
    • You can tell the smell of a skunk and the smell of a feed lot apart. (Loolp. The air is so clean out here.)
    • The meaning of true love is that you'll ride in the tractor with him. (-.- *cough* No. Never.)
    • You consider a building a mall if it's bigger than the local Wal-Mart[/size] (They're too lazy and simple to ever pass this motion ._. But I'd really love one. <3)

    Offline Belgium

    Re: Common Courtesy
    «Reply #20: December 16, 2008, 12:46:12 PM»
    I've lived in the Northeast (New York) my entire life and I can pretty much say with confidence that people are complete assholes up here, especially when it comes to stores and driving. I went to Williamsburg, Virginia this summer and I was absolutely amazed by how much friendlier everyone was. People greeted you when you came into their store, people didn't cut you off or nearly run you into other cars..It was like heaven for a little while!

    Offline Gineviève

    Re: Common Courtesy
    «Reply #21: December 16, 2008, 12:49:39 PM»
    Move to the South!

    Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama.
    The people are half retarded there,
    but everyone's generally nice.
    A greeting in the grocery store,
    a hello when they pass you, and
    mostly concerned about your day.

    Avoid Florida, though. Lots and lots
    of Bible-huggers with pictures of
    gays and abortions at the street
    intersections to scare you. :[

    Offline Sedde

    Re: Common Courtesy
    «Reply #22: December 16, 2008, 02:48:15 PM»
    Would New Mexico count as "the south," then...? 'Cause that's where I wanna move, I'm sick of midwesterners wanting to be New Yorkers and being jerks. :( Stupid Ohio.

    Offline Magma

    Re: Common Courtesy
    «Reply #23: December 16, 2008, 03:28:02 PM»
    I would have to agree that common courtesy is...lacking...in places. Not just in your city. The town that I grew up in was really big on two genre's. The church-going 'goody two-shoes' and the pregnant/gangster high-school dropout. If you didn't go to church, you were expected to drop out or get pregnant before graduation. I have no idea if it's toned down since then, though I certainly hope it has.

    And because my family reared me and my brother under a church-going pretense it put me in the position of acting the way I don't want to act (as a fraud, in essence). Southern Baptists are very, VERY adament about certain things. Namely their so-called 'conversion' rate. Most of the Baptist churches (or even Methodist for that matter) like to take their youths on little excursions and convince them that their way is right. It's to the point that you sit in a crowd of moaning, hand-flailing, weepy children and young-adults, cringing because you are the only one not buying into it for a second. And if you aren't all red-eyed by the end of that weekend, they do the "next best thing" and have a sit down with your parents to make them fork over more money as a "donation to the church" and send us out on another excursion to try again.

    It reaches a point after the third or fourth "adventure" that one either truly 'sees the light' or just breaks under peer pressure. Conformity is their greatest ally and they use it through emotional response.

    When did it become right for a church to practically become a dictatorship? Last I understood, America was still a free-religion country, right? Since when is it common courtesy to pressure an individual into doing what the other teens at the establishment are doing?

    That's why I like agnosticism. Nobody's right, and nobody's wrong, and I remain free to choose my own road.


    Do you live next door to me? xD

    Offline Heimdall

    Re: Common Courtesy
    «Reply #24: December 16, 2008, 03:51:41 PM»
    I dunno about NY, but the northeast isn't all bad. Folks in Maine (at least in the places we're in) are pretty nice. :3