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Author Topic: Pet ideas?  (Read 1589 times)

Offline MT

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Pet ideas?
«: January 25, 2009, 11:05:24 AM»
For a while I've wanted to new pet, but I can't make up my mind with what I want! Definitely a pet that pretty much only stays in it's cage like snakes, birds, reptiles, etc (not dogs, or cats). Any suggestions? I'm home alot and have the money to be able to take good care of it.
I'm a big fan of birds and reptiles like snakes and lizards :D so.. what do you guys suggest?

 
        

Offline Skink

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #1: January 25, 2009, 11:19:57 AM»
Ball or Carpet Pythons are good choices for snakes. They're manageable in size, (Ball don't often exceed 4 feet, Carpet pythons are longer but not as thick) and are a lot more fun to handle imo compared to the colubrids like corn snakes.

Bearded dragons are real babies and adjust to handling well, plus reach a larger size. Leopard geckos and african fat-tailed geckos are also very chill lizards, but they don't get as large. Beardies need vegetables in their diet and all three eat more often then snakes, so you must be prepared for some grocery runs.

I can't really recommend much on birds other then hyacinth macaws but parrots live for so long and it would probably be a lot harder to find a breeder, plus are much more expensive and despite being cage animals need HUUUUGE cages and lots of outside cage time.

I have a ball python myself and she's a new addition but very, very sweet, inquisitive, and full of personality for a reptile <3 I've also kept the two gecko species and like them both, still have a leo, my boyfriend loves beardies. Carpet pythons are just a general something I hear often, good for beginners and smaller. A family friend also swears by crested geckos but they're a bit flighty, and are arboreal so an escape can leave them out of reach on the ceiling.

Don't be seduced by some of the prettier reptiles like Tokay geckos or Green Iguanas. They can become very problematic individuals and Tokays as a whole are aggressive and unhandleable :( Iguanas are also "moody" and both have very specific care requirements that are a bit harder to meet and much less forgiving of mistakes. Snakes like the Rainbow Boa are not very trusting and weary of handling, and the Blood Pythons have a reputation of being bitey for a good portion of their lives. Great hands-on reptiles are the ones I listed and King, Milk, Corn or Rat snakes.

As a taste of irony, I also happen to think rats make excellent pets :) They're just not too long-lived :(

Offline Cornelius

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #2: January 25, 2009, 11:22:38 AM»
Birds: Red crowned parrot, If you get them at a young age you can teach them how to not bite humans if you handle them. I espically like these birds because I had one when I was younger, He drank Sprite and didn't get sick :3.

As paint said, Iguanas and tokays are very aggressive, I used to have an Iguana and he attacked someone over territory  :(

Offline Geisteskrank

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #3: January 25, 2009, 11:22:47 AM»
My sister had an iguana once, and iguanas are certainly awesome, but I don't know much about caring for them. D: What I do know is guinea pigs. 8) lol. Guinea pigs are total sweethearts and they can be hilarious with their weird little behaviors. Read up on 'em and see if you like them: wikiwikiwiki

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Offline Anarchy

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #4: January 25, 2009, 11:31:38 AM»
I have a tarantula she's really cool to watch and easy to take care of, but she can be kinda grumpy. Usually they are very shy so it's better not to handle them.

Offline Drug

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #5: January 25, 2009, 11:36:08 AM»
Oh boy. As far as reptiles go, ball pythons are great because you get all the fun in owning a big snake that doesn't get -that- big. There's a ton of smaller corn snakes and the like in the pet trade, in those cases it's just which ever is prettiest to you. (Kingsnakes!) I personally want a bearded dragon because they get 2ft and get super tame very easily so they're nice and go good with friends/family/kids.. and they're pretty fun to watch with the little things they do sometimes.

Big birds are great and smart and talk wonderfully, but if you have one, you really would need to take it out of the cage and play with it. If you want something that stays in the cage, I'd suggest picking up a couple of parakeets. They're just as fun to watch as finches, but if you want to pick them up, they can be just like big birds if you tame them.

Also if you live in a big town, try going to a pet expo. I know they have alot here. Sorry I ramble, just throwing some things out there.
TLDR: Ball python, bearded dragon, or 2-3 parakeets.

Offline MT

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Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #6: January 25, 2009, 11:44:46 AM»
Paint: I've always wanted a ball python, and as long as it doesn't get too big for me to handle easily, they sound like a great pet. Leopard geckos are a personal favorite of mine when it comes to lizards. Especially because they always look like they're smiling :)

Wringe: I looked up the red crowned parrot, it looks pretty damn awesome! I'll definitely keep that in mind if I decide on getting a bird.

B13: haha, I love guinea pigs! My friend has one, she's very friendly and looks pretty easy to take care of.

Anarchy: Hmm, I'm honestly terrified of spiders, but my friend has one as a pet and says they're really interesting and easy to take care of. Even though I'm not a big fan of them I'll still keep it in mind! (Since my brother really wants one)

Drug: Like I stated, ball pythons look like a really awesome pet to have! I would honestly like something that's a little smaller, but I'm really considering getting one. Bearded dragons also sound good, and I am in love with parakeets. My dad used to have one when I was little, and it would rest on my head  :P

Offline $kye

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #7: January 25, 2009, 11:52:52 AM»
ill agree with paint that leopard geckos are great (ive had one for like 10 years and he doesn't do -too- much but its definitely a pet that you dont have to constantly take out of its cage and stuff)

as far as birds uhh lovebirds are good. ive heard though if you get two that theyll bond more with eachother than the owner but idk how true that is. theres also a small bird called a parrotlet (idk if anyone mentioned it here) but theyre roughly around lovebird size maybe smaller but they can actually learn to talk and theyre very cute.

id have to say though that birds would definitely have to be given attention a lot more than a leopard gecko, especially if you decided to get a bigger bird.

Offline MT

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Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #8: January 25, 2009, 12:00:29 PM»
The parrotlet is adorable! I love birds like that, especially if you can teach them how to talk. I'm not very good with larger birds, since all the ones I know tend to be loud and bitey.

Offline Adielle

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #9: January 26, 2009, 07:44:02 AM»
Well, I'm not sure which type of animals you've had in the past, so I will stick to the best first-time owner sorts of each type of animal.  I'd definitely agree with Paint, Ball Pythons stay a bit smaller in size and are easily manageable.  Red Tailed Boas get larger, but they are also a very good species if your looking at snakes.  Bearded dragons are wonderful as well and both personable and fairly easy to take care of.  Uromastyx can be hard to find, but also good pets and able to be handled quite a lot, they tend to be quite docile.  Uromastyx do need a desert inclosure though, so be sure to have enough money for a decent sized tank and a good heat lamp.

Paint: "Don't be seduced by some of the prettier reptiles like Tokay geckos or Green Iguanas."

You seem to know your reptiles.  I'm glad you wrote this.  I have had one too many a person want to buy tokays only to find out the truth.  Honestly, while gorgeous reptiles, they really cannot be handled, or at least in my expierence they can't.  I have yet to find one that can be handled well.  They open their mouths and "bark" at you before launching themselves at your finger and grasping hold for a good while before letting go.  I was one of the few people that wasn't afraid to clean their enclosure, but it wasn't always pretty either.  Beautiful creatures, but definitely NOT the best pets.

If you haven't had any parrots before or if you've only ever had budgies, finches or lovebirds, I'd highly recommend quaker parrots or green cheek conures.  They are both easy to train and handle for first time bird owners.  Having worked with birds for going on five years now, I'd recommend reading a bit before completely solidifying your choice, to make sure the bird is right for you and youre schedule.  If your not sure how to properly train a parrot, then look for a store or breeder that is selling hand-reared/hand-fed young, these parrots will usually be much easier to handle straight away as they have been trained already.  A good breeder or pet store will be able to answer all your questions and also should be able to help you if your confused about anything or if you need extra help with your parrot.

If you have had a parrot before, there are many other types I can recommend to you, but not knowing I felt these two are the easiest to train if you want something larger then a budgie.  Sun conures and blue headed conures are wonderful as well, but they are usually much more noisy and may not be quite as easy to train easily unless they've been hand-reared.  I suppose, more then anything, type of bird depends on both your surrounds and your schedule.  If you live in an apartment, a noisy breed might not be a good idea, or if you don't have very much time to spend with the animal, it would probably be better to get a bit of a stand-offish type like an indian ringneck, although they are not always as affectionate either. 

I worked mainly with macaws, amazons, cockatoo, pionus and african greys, the larger species, so if you've had parrots before and want information on these types I can help.  Feel free to message me if you want any more information.  :)

P.S. Hyacinth macaws are very hard to find as there are not many breeders.  When it become illegal to take birds from the wild and transfer them between countries, hyacinths thinned out, many breeders were overseas and there are not many in the US and other countries.  In the US a hyacinth will cost upwards of $10-20k, in Australia, its closer to $30-40k.  While they are one of the more docile of the macaw species, they are still similarly "playfully pinchy/bitey" and can often times be quite stubborn.  I only say this, because its been sad having to rehabilitate so many wonderful macaws that sat in their cages for a good many years (one of them had been locked away for 10 years) never coming out because the owners bought them as "decoration" birds from stores who did not give the right information and so they start plucking and don't understand people, which is a good reason for them starting to bite and being overly loud and hard to care for.  Birds don't need as much time as dogs, but its important to try and get them out for about an hour a day at least, they enjoy company and its good to bond with your parrot.  All three of my parrots come out for a good while each day, they don't always need to be next to you, but rather being in the same room sitting on a play stand or on top of their cage can make them happy.  I find my parrots like company and attention, even if its simply talking to them.

« Last Edit: January 26, 2009, 07:55:33 AM by Adielle »
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Offline Adielle

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #10: January 26, 2009, 08:02:45 AM»
I have a tarantula she's really cool to watch and easy to take care of, but she can be kinda grumpy. Usually they are very shy so it's better not to handle them.

They can be basically categorized as "old world" or "new world."  Pink toe tarantulas for instance are a good example of "old world" tarantulas.  Old world, meaning one defense and thats to bite.  You'll know when this is about to happen because they rear up on their hind legs with their front legs in the air.  A good example of a "new world" tarantula is a rose haired tarantula.  New world signifies two defenses.  First is the little prickly hairs you'll feel on your skin if you hold them, this might not hurt you, actually it only tickles, but for a small insect it could hurt.  Second defense is biting, rearing up, but they tend not to use this defense unless all else fails.  You'll know if they are uncomfortable if you start feeling little pricks of their hairs on your skin and thats a good sign to put the tarantula away.  I myself won't hold pink toed tarantulas, they are tree spiders and rather finicky and jumpy.  Rose hairs on the other hand can be much easier to handle and you can indeed handle them.  The biggest thing with handling them if remaining calm and moving slow.  I have held them and never been bitten.  Do not grab them from their enclosure, the best way to get them out without making their defenses react is by using a small piece of paper and getting them to crawl up the edge of the enclosure until they walk themselves onto your palm.  This way they move on their own naturally so they don't get startled.

Just a tip.  :)


as far as birds uhh lovebirds are good. ive heard though if you get two that theyll bond more with eachother than the owner but idk how true that is. theres also a small bird called a parrotlet (idk if anyone mentioned it here) but theyre roughly around lovebird size maybe smaller but they can actually learn to talk and theyre very cute.

Thats actually true of almost every type of bird.  I'd never recommend putting two birds together unless the owner doesn't want to play with them or bond with them.  On top of that you'll encounter a few other problems as well; one will become more protective almost always and therefore may be more bitey.  If you'd ever plan on getting two parrots to put in a cage together they must have been together before you bought them, or they may or may not get along.  For instance, say you bought one love bird from one store and one from another and you wanted to put them together, they could in fact attack each other and they may or may not even bond.  If you want two, its better to buy an already bonded pair from a pet store or breeder, the effort in trying to put two together that haven't been together is a bit much.  Parakeets aren't so bad, usually they'll jump in with others easily because most stores and breeders have many in one cage, but love birds and any larger parrots need a period to get used to each other before they are stuffed in the same cage, which means you'll need two cages for a while and its a slow process.  Not really fun if your on a budget or don't know what your doing.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2009, 08:09:48 AM by Adielle »
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Offline Anarchy

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #11: January 26, 2009, 08:21:18 AM»
Yea, Stella is a new world t, a chilean rose hair, but she gets stressed out very easily. I've held her a few times, but last time I did she started flicking utricating hairs so I haven't really been handling her. It's just unnecissary tbh and I think she feels alot better if I just leave her alone.

I'm pursuing a career in entomology, so I know quite a bit about spiders and their behavior. She's very sweet, but as I said, very shy. She will start flicking hairs, rear up, or run away before she would ever bite though. Problem is she has very poor eyesite so she also sometimes gets confused as to whether or not something is food, like when I pour water in her bowl she attacks it sometimes.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2009, 08:27:19 AM by Anarchy »

Offline Nny

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #12: January 26, 2009, 08:37:18 AM»
Me.

Get a banana slug, Beep.
You know that would be awesome.

Offline Adielle

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #13: January 26, 2009, 08:40:21 AM»
Yea, Stella is a new world t, a chilean rose hair, but she gets stressed out very easily. I've held her a few times, but last time I did she started flicking utricating hairs so I haven't really been handling her. It's just unnecissary tbh and I think she feels alot better if I just leave her alone.

I'm pursuing a career in entomology, so I know quite a bit about spiders and their behavior. She's very sweet, but as I said, very shy. She will start flicking hairs, rear up, or run away before she would ever bite though. Problem is she has very poor eyesite so she also sometimes gets confused as to whether or not something is food, like when I pour water in her bowl she attacks it sometimes.

Aww, cool!  I'm just a bird specialist.  I work as a zookeeper for the bird show at Taronga Zoo, well, did for the past months and will be going back to school for a bachelor in Ancient History and Archeology and I'll be doing a certificate at the zoo on the side as well and possibly doing more work with the bird show.  I know a bit about reptiles, small mammals and such as well, but its definitely not a superior knowledge by any means.  You probably know quite a bit more about spiders then I do with what you said.  You comment was rather short though, so I figured I'd expand in case you didn't know, but I was wrong.  :p

Yea, I agree, if you've notice her getting anxious (if thats even a good word to use for spiders, I really don't know how you'd explain...maybe defensive is a better word?), its always good to put them down, give them a rest and let them be for a few days.  I'm not a huge fan of spiders, but I've worked around them for some time and admire their beauty.  I have held one, but I don't think I would personally own one.  I have plenty of redbacks trying to high under my stoop and when I was still working at the zoo, the areas us zookeepers use to go through the woods where tourists don't go....they don't get cleared out often so we have loads of species.  I am particularily fond of the saint andrew's cross and garden orb weaving spider, beautiful spiders.  My husband is terrified of huntsman because they can "strafe."  Its rather funny.  I'm usually the "spider mover" if they get into the house.  I know the general australian species, bit little else.  Rose hair tarantulas are the only type I've handled.
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Offline Anarchy

Re: Pet ideas?
«Reply #14: January 26, 2009, 08:49:37 AM»
I've always loved spiders, particularly jumping spiders. As a kid I tried to pet one and squished it... I cried so hard lol. Nah I kept it short because she hadn't mentioned anything about spiders and I didn't want to clutter her thread with a bunch of spider info she probably didn't need... and I tend to ramble when I get going about spider information lmao. That's really cool you worked at a zoo! I'd love to do that, maybe taking care of the insects etc. But yea. If I wanted to I could start listing scientific names (Grammatolsa Rosea and of course my favorite, the Phiddipus). You sound like my mom, saving widows and scorpions lmao. THERE I GO lol i'll stop srry.