turtles
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: Copying other people's distinct styles  (Read 2977 times)

Offline Sapphirus

Copying other people's distinct styles
«: March 06, 2009, 03:22:08 PM»
Had to redo my thread since my other came out wrong.


There's some people on deviantART and some cartoons/anime that have distinct art styles, Like you have DBZ, Sonic, Naruto and other popular stuff. Sometimes you see someone design their characters based off of a re-color from an already made cartoon screenshot or from a copyrighted character with a different name though and some new clothes. And some of them call it "original" even though it's right off another person's character.

Usuaully I hear that any character made today is not "100%" original anymore because another will always have a similarity to what they have.

What are you opinions for stuff like these, and please, keep them towards the topic.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2009, 03:31:10 PM by Sapphirus »

 
        

Offline Eevee

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #1: March 06, 2009, 03:22:49 PM»
This is the only warning. Stay on topic and do not flame.

Offline Eevee

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #2: March 06, 2009, 03:40:04 PM»
I remember seeing someone on dA who was practicing Bleedman's art style and then started taking cheaper commissions/requests than his just so people could get art in Bleedman's style. I forgot their name though.

The way I see it though is some people copy others' styles because that's what inspired them to draw, and so they want to draw like that. Some copy others' styles, especially in the case of fan-characters, so that they match and look like they belong in whatever show/book/etc. they're created for. Then there's the ones that copy others' styles for the hopes they'll become  popular just like the actual artist they're copying.

I used to draw in Walt Disney's style as a kid until I was introduced to the anime fandom when I was 7 and stuck with anime, with the exclusion of forced realism from the scolding but loving advanced art teacher, ever since. I tried both Sailor Moon and Clamp's Magic Knights Rayearth style and eventually deviated away from it to what my style is now, although still anime, I suppose its unique enough people look and go "Hey that's Eevee/Mynt's work!"

It helps but at the same time it doesn't, you learn some helpful things from someone else's style but at the same time you may be learning the same mistakes they may be making without realizing it.

Offline Sapphirus

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #3: March 06, 2009, 03:46:33 PM»
I remember seeing someone on dA who was practicing Bleedman's art style and then started taking cheaper commissions/requests than his just so people could get art in Bleedman's style. I forgot their name though.

The way I see it though is some people copy others' styles because that's what inspired them to draw, and so they want to draw like that. Some copy others' styles, especially in the case of fan-characters, so that they match and look like they belong in whatever show/book/etc. they're created for. Then there's the ones that copy others' styles for the hopes they'll become  popular just like the actual artist they're copying.

I used to draw in Walt Disney's style as a kid until I was introduced to the anime fandom when I was 7 and stuck with anime, with the exclusion of forced realism from the scolding but loving advanced art teacher, ever since. I tried both Sailor Moon and Clamp's Magic Knights Rayearth style and eventually deviated away from it to what my style is now, although still anime, I suppose its unique enough people look and go "Hey that's Eevee/Mynt's work!"

It helps but at the same time it doesn't, you learn some helpful things from someone else's style but at the same time you may be learning the same mistakes they may be making without realizing it.

I used to draw from some animes and things I loved but them I got a reality check, and realized I had to create my own style. I think I was about 7 or 8 or something when I was thinking about it, I was drawing since 3, with those little baby type arts xD.
I started out from the cursed "tracing" method, and I still regret starting out liek that, but of course i was young and more dumb in the art world.

I know this guy on DA who draw excatly in "Disney's" stlye, and would make a good back-up for drawing their stuff. I was starting out by drawing other peoples stuff, just looking and referencing. I grew up with DBZ, Mario and Sonic mostly, so I was drawing their stuff and some other things during the start.

It's just sad when people sometimes draw their characters exactly based off the creator's style type.

As for me, I have this fetish with spikey hair characters and wings, wings is my most favorite thing to add to my Ocs. Sometimes I go overboard by making them too complex or drawing pairs of them that don't anatomically look correct.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2009, 03:52:28 PM by Sapphirus »

Offline Anarchy

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #4: March 06, 2009, 04:06:53 PM»
It helps but at the same time it doesn't, you learn some helpful things from someone else's style but at the same time you may be learning the same mistakes they may be making without realizing it.

I completely agree! This is why if you are going to learn from other artists you need to learn to recognize their mistakes. You also should to learn to forge your own unique traits that differentiate you from that artist if you want to be recognized as 'original'.

In nature there is something called 'convergence'. This is when animals in two different parts of the world evolve similarly. Nature isn't being unoriginal... it's just adapting to different environments that are alike because, well, that's what works. I think the same thing can be said about art.

There is nothing wrong with imitating style... so long as you aren't copying directly or REALLY ripping off an artist. Say... having a similar style to TLK and making a lion that looks almost the same as Simba and acts almost the same as Simba and naming it Sinba or something... You just need to know when you are taking 'imitation' too far.

Offline Lovecraft

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #5: March 06, 2009, 04:10:51 PM»
I drew from a lot of different styles. One of my biggest resources, especially as of late, have been old pin-ups from the 40's, 50's, and 60's. Artists like George Petty, Gil Elvgren, Pearl Frush, Rolf Armstrong, Olivia, Al Buell, Sorayama, and even Bill Ward are all noteworthy people that I've been fascinated with.
We shall see that at which dogs howl in the dark, and that at which cats prick up their ears after midnight.

Offline Mredria

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #6: March 06, 2009, 04:48:23 PM»
Style biting is never ok. That being said, a lot of people borrow from other people's styles and bring something new and interesting to the party. A lot of people don't, and that sucks but I usually don't watch/look at those people's art because they have a history of being boring.
However, a lot of people confuse "style stealing" and drawing within a "Genre". One could argue that Sonic/Naruto have become their own genre, so it wouldn't be style biting, it would be drawing within the Sonic Genre(or Sailor moon, or pokemon, or lion king, Whatever.). Regardless, it's the Same thing. If you bring something new and interesting to it, I love it, if you don't, I don't look at it because it's not interesting. I don't really worry about originality because if it isn't original it isn't interesting, so it pretty much gets filtered out.
---I apologize---

Offline Lovedoll

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #7: March 06, 2009, 06:31:29 PM»
Humans learn by mimic. Children grow up by mimicking the acts of their rolemodel (the parent mostly) and that is how they learn to walk, talk and pretty much do anything else. So to frown upon people who learn to draw by mimicking another style and tracing drawings is pretty stupid. How else are you supposed to learn? It doesn't make them any less of an artist nor does it make them bad people. This whole attitude of "I'm better than these people" because someone grew into their own style is slowly grinding on my nerves. I wish people would stop doing that, if for the simple fact that everyone is insulting themselves as they do it. <.<; Every single one of us who've ever touched pencil to paper have traced *something*, or tried to copy *something*. Whether that was as a 6 year old or when you turned 18. And it's definitely not something to be ashamed of.

It's a different deal when someone purposely copies and art style out of petty motives, such as cheating an artist out of money or taking revenge of some sort. But if someone really likes a particular series and they're a real fan of it, why is it so wrong they draw in that style? If you don't like it, just ignore it and move on.

As for originality... nothing in life is 100% original. Our fantasy and knowledge all has one basic foundation: reality. Everything we think up is based on something we have already seen.

Offline Hugo

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #8: March 06, 2009, 11:00:46 PM»
If you try to be a cool dude by copying a cool dude down to the kind of underwear he wears, then you turn out to be a creeper instead.

It's similar with art -- unless you have a personal touch, something just doesn't feel right.

Offline Sapphirus

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #9: March 09, 2009, 02:07:55 PM»
If you try to be a cool dude by copying a cool dude down to the kind of underwear he wears, then you turn out to be a creeper instead.

It's similar with art -- unless you have a personal touch, something just doesn't feel right.
\\
Nicely Said.

Offline Ashuri

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #10: March 22, 2009, 12:34:17 PM»
It's hard now a days to copyright art styles.  My character was created through the Sonic fandom, because I grew up on Sonic the Hedgehog.  That's when I wanted to start learning how to draw and so my art started as the "Sonic art style" everyone knows of, only I altered most of the characters to create my own and then Ashuri just became her own person along the years. 

As far as art goes, I got inspired by an artist named Sonitweek on DA http://sonitweek.deviantart.com.  I enjoyed looking through all of her artwork and I wanted to learn to draw like her, and be able to put my character onto paper.  I traced, free-handed copied, and all that jazz for practice and it's how I got to where I am today.  The only difference is that I didn't directly copy her particular "style."  She still has her distinct style, and with my practice and years of drawing, I created my own with the help of hers.  Mine grew in it's own kind of style and no one else can really copy my style "directly."  No matter how many people try to learn off of another artist's style, they will still have their unique way of drawing it which makes it different. 

So, I look at it as a way for artists to practice and learn more through trying different styles that other artists use.  I still look through lots of other art pieces done by other people to learn how they create body structure and poses (studying in other words), but now that I have my own unique way of drawing things, I have my own style.  Which, in turn, can probably be copied by someone else and then they'll grow off of it and create their own in the long run.

Offline Sapphirus

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #11: May 04, 2009, 06:29:03 PM»
It's hard now a days to copyright art styles.  My character was created through the Sonic fandom, because I grew up on Sonic the Hedgehog.  That's when I wanted to start learning how to draw and so my art started as the "Sonic art style" everyone knows of, only I altered most of the characters to create my own and then Ashuri just became her own person along the years. 

As far as art goes, I got inspired by an artist named Sonitweek on DA http://sonitweek.deviantart.com.  I enjoyed looking through all of her artwork and I wanted to learn to draw like her, and be able to put my character onto paper.  I traced, free-handed copied, and all that jazz for practice and it's how I got to where I am today.  The only difference is that I didn't directly copy her particular "style."  She still has her distinct style, and with my practice and years of drawing, I created my own with the help of hers.  Mine grew in it's own kind of style and no one else can really copy my style "directly."  No matter how many people try to learn off of another artist's style, they will still have their unique way of drawing it which makes it different. 

So, I look at it as a way for artists to practice and learn more through trying different styles that other artists use.  I still look through lots of other art pieces done by other people to learn how they create body structure and poses (studying in other words), but now that I have my own unique way of drawing things, I have my own style.  Which, in turn, can probably be copied by someone else and then they'll grow off of it and create their own in the long run.

Same thing with me, Sapph's hair design was like a spikey-knock-off from Sonic because it's the games i've been playing since I was little and I drew him a lot while growing up, plus i fandom spikey hair. The whole Sapphirus-is-axel-rip-off thing isn't actually valid, because for one the reason for her hair being red for those times was really because me and a few friends on furcadia in an AI dream decided to have a fan-trend for him, having our character's hair red to celebrate our love for the character off kingdom hearts. Most similar thing on Sapph was his is the eye-markings and the spikey sideburns.

Begining Sapphirus had slightly less spiked sideburns and her eye-marking were light blue in the past instead of black. Actually, Sapphirus was just a fuzzy-cat-dragon looking female with no clothes except for spiked bracers.

Offline Lassa

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #12: May 13, 2009, 01:26:53 PM»
To the people who say style biting is never okay - you have to remember that to have a career in animation, you HAVE to be able to copy styles. it's a skill that's required, since there are almost always multiple animators on the job.

Offline Hugo

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #13: May 13, 2009, 02:35:39 PM»
I think that's more of a point used between hobby artists. If your job requires you follow the main animator's style, that's a bit different than joe shmo drawing everything in Sonic style for the hell of it.

Offline Alluvial

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #14: May 17, 2009, 03:45:52 AM»
I started seriously drawing by eyeballing Sailor Moon comics/pictures and freehanding my own copies of them. Over a decade later, I've had to do the same thing with master works for my figure drawing classes. Why? Because much can be gained in the way of technique by mimicking the style of others.

Now, just because I can copy Leonardo's style of studying hands doesn't mean I prefer to work in it. I actually intently study portrait artists that I admire, trying to figure out what techniques they might use for shading hair, etc.

At the end of the day, though, what I produce from this mish-mash of styles, techniques and years of practice is still uniquely my own. There is nothing new under the sun, so we combine that which we take in and make something new.

You can't copyright a style, but I would like to hope that these artists who are mimicking others will eventually grow into their own style and move on.

I think it would be horribly dull if everyone made artwork the exact same way.

(Apologies for any lack of coherence... 5 am... need sleep.... sleeeep...)


Wiggle wiggle wiggle.

Je suis la kitter verte!

Sookan

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #15: May 17, 2009, 06:28:26 AM»
i can't help my style being disgustingly cartoony. Vanilla K, BK, maygikal, luna, bluefish, TAA...... they're the kind of artists i "grew up" around and it just RUBS OFF. i've been guilty of sparkledogism and yes.. i'm a gay feral artist. always have been. i've tried everything from realism to disney and i still can't make my art look anything like a cheap attempt at being badass in kiddy cartoon.
i think my style is a hodgepodge of basically every artist i've admired & tried to copy at some point.

every artist in the world takes reference from another at some point. as original as you like to think you are, i can guarantee someone's done it before you and they've done it twice as good. that said i absolutely hate sonic style and sonic-esque characters. if i could bury one fandom in the world, sonic would be it. or maybe just furry in general. two birds one stone.

there's no such thing as stealing "styles". i used to draw at an oekaki, an' i've heard of every kind of theft people are able to pull out of their asses and style ripping is the 2nd most bullshit after "pose theft".

a lot of animators find drawing to one consistant style to be quite difficult. iirc there's a special kind of animator usually employed to edit everyone's art and make it all consistant and flow and shit, but i forgot the actual title.

i miss my artistic childhood ;_;

Offline Suzy

Re: Copying other people's distinct styles
«Reply #16: June 09, 2009, 02:00:22 AM»
I have no real style yet, I think... but I think everyone starts out by copying styles. I started drawing heavily because of anime, so naturally that's the sort of "style genre" I fell into. Thus, I draw chunky hair and big-ish eyes. I'm a stickler for making eyes not really huge, though. XD Anyway.

I have, however, learned to draw all of these things in ways that are subtly different from other people's anime styles.

In summary, copying a really specific style and drawing everything the exact way someone else does for popularity reasons is NOT okay. Learning from other people's styles, using tidbits, and eventually finding out how you prefer to draw things is great.

</ramble>