turtles
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: developing your own style  (Read 1076 times)

Offline pin

developing your own style
«: July 03, 2009, 11:12:45 PM»
does anyone have tips on developing your own style?

i've heard that drawing realism can help..

if you have and tips or drawing exercises or whatever, post it please n_n

 
        

Offline Hugo

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #1: July 03, 2009, 11:53:38 PM»
I get 'comfortable' drawing things a certain way. If you draw by the book and it doesn't feel right, try letting your hand lead you. It may not be realistic, but that's not what art is really about.

Offline Suzy

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #2: July 04, 2009, 02:20:49 AM»
Since I've starting going through the basics more thoroughly, I've noticed that the way some people develop styles is to learn how figures are realistically drawn, simplifying the figures, and making changes to create a desirable image. If that makes sense. XD

IPGD

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #3: July 04, 2009, 06:24:19 AM»
Style is not something you should think about. Don't even worry about it.

There are two types of "style": Personal style and intentional style.

Personal style is like handwriting; it comes naturally and is unavoidable. If you can pick up a pencil and draw, you have your own personal style. Everything you make has your own personal touch in some way, be it from the way you lay your brush strokes or how you construct your figures.

Intentional style is a conscious stylization. It is where you take the rules and break them, in order to make a piece more aesthetically pleasing, befitting of the desired mood, or in order to mimic another person's personal and/or intentional style. If you are still asking questions like "how do I develop my own style?", you aren't ready for intentional stylization.

See my signature for more information.


Quote
It may not be realistic, but that's not what art is really about.
It may not be what art is about, but it's definitely what the learning process of good art is about ::) If you're struggling with a concept, try to better understand it instead of giving up.

Offline Suzy

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #4: July 04, 2009, 12:47:39 PM»
I made the mistake of drawing a "style" right away, like most animu fan girls. That conscious stylization didn't work out for me since I didn't don't know how to construct a figure correctly. So, I'm going back, studying anatomy and lighting and such, then I'll simplify it and add stylization once I'm comfortable with drawing figures realistically.

Offline Hugo

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #5: July 04, 2009, 01:40:53 PM»
Quote
It may not be realistic, but that's not what art is really about.
It may not be what art is about, but it's definitely what the learning process of good art is about ::) If you're struggling with a concept, try to better understand it instead of giving up.
I meant that not every piece of art has to be realistic. A lot of people try so hard to do realism that they're afraid to develop their own style which can result in very weird-looking and forced pieces.

I agree that a basic understanding of real anatomy is necessary to build off it.

IPGD

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #6: July 04, 2009, 02:14:54 PM»
Quote
I meant that not every piece of art has to be realistic.
That's why I said "the learning process". Sure, not every piece has to be realistic, but every artist does. It's important to differentiate between these two concepts, especially at the early stages of skill development; if you end up needing to let you "hand lead you" at that point, it's usually because you don't know what you're doing. That can change once you have become more distinguished, with a better eye for composition and better sense for conveying poignancy through image and stylistic liberties taken thereupon -- but let's be honest, when you're still just bullshitting everything, it's safe to say the only sense that is leading you is your bullshit.

Quote
A lot of people try so hard to do realism that they're afraid to develop their own style which can result in very weird-looking and forced pieces.
I've never seen this, honestly, just people who are bad at drawing realistically. Usually the inverse is far more common, where a person tries too hard to draw in a particular style while eschewing all classical knowledge. This effect can happen while transitioning between style obsession and a more realistic approach -- in which case it's more like puberty for artists than anything. It's just something you need to work through, zits and all.

Offline Suzy

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #7: July 04, 2009, 03:47:08 PM»
This effect can happen while transitioning between style obsession and a more realistic approach -- in which case it's more like puberty for artists than anything. It's just something you need to work through, zits and all.

...I have to do multiple puberties at the same time? D:

Offline pin

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #8: July 06, 2009, 10:55:25 PM»
See my signature for more information.

i did see and i am now enlightened. thanks for the reply n_n time to break out that dusty anatomy book and my sister's color theory book

i appreciate the other replies as well; thanks!

Offline Suzy

Re: developing your own style
«Reply #9: July 07, 2009, 01:09:14 PM»
See my signature for more information.

i did see and i am now enlightened. thanks for the reply n_n time to break out that dusty anatomy book and my sister's color theory book

i appreciate the other replies as well; thanks!

I thought the same thing when I finally humbled myself enough to actually look at it. :3

 

anything