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Author Topic: Critique and advise?  (Read 3999 times)

Offline xAfflictedAngel

Critique and advise?
«: July 09, 2009, 11:24:50 PM»


I made this port specifically to find out how well I'd do, and I'm quite proud of the way it turned out, especially the hair.
Anyway, what I want is to see what other people (besides my friends), think of it. Would you buy it if it was for sale? What do you think it would be worth? What are my main areas I need to improve (besides shading clothes)? Should I make more?

Now, before we start, I should probably say a few things.
--I will not take any commissions. Ever. I once thought I would, with a friend shading while I did lineart, but I just can't make myself do characters I don't come up with. So it's premades only.
--I'm incredibly slow. I have a very bad habit of doing the lineart, and letting it sit for months before shading. (I did the lineart for this port in January)
--This port is not for sale, it may be sometime, but not right now.
--There are several things I can't do, that I would love to figure out. -Drawing the folds in clothing with the pencil tool in FoxEd, -shading without the grid-pattern, which I thing looks crappy and unprofessional (on my ports anyway. I've seen others I liked it on), -Drawing hands, feet, etc. with the pencil tool in FoxEd.

Anyway, please critique, be as harsh as you need to, I can take it. And if you see anything I didn't mention that needs improvement, feel free to point it out with red. The image is JPGed, so major changes will be impossible.

Thanks!
~Affie

 
        

Offline Suzy

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #1: July 10, 2009, 12:37:43 AM»
Take is as a "consumer's opinion" since I'm no expert at any of this: (Why am I automatically adding this to all critiques now? Have I learned something about myself?! Le gasp!)

Just a few things I immediately notice, the eyes seem too far apart, and it bothers me how the clavicles are not defined. (I have a weird clavicle fetish or something, though, so i would automatically favor something with a more defined collar bone. :3) I agree with you, the hair is gorgeous. Something about the way you shaded it though makes me.. I dunno, nervous? Golly gee, I'm helpful.

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #2: July 10, 2009, 01:12:13 AM»
First off let me say this is very cute I love the colors and the outfit you did an exceptional job and you should be proud of it, as you are. Your quite advanced and I can see amazing improvements in the future and possible expect amazing art to come from you!

For your critiques you asked for:
As for shading you will have to find a light source. The direction in which the light travels. To start with decide which light color and brigtness you are using. Like yellows, clear/whites, and different colors like blues and purples. Use a arrow to point in the direction of the light to your character is it pointing straight at them or from below? Is there a back light (light that reflects of a surface and bounces off to another surface which reflects light to. Like skin). I can yammer on till I'm blue but the best way I learned to do shading and what not (still working on it I know how tough it is) is to have and arrow pointing in the direction on the object (or character) and on a separate layer draw circles where the light will shine and when you color it you color it in and shade it and what have you. Remember shading and lighting, lighting is where light travels and reflects, shading is where light can't reach.
This isn't very good but it will help you understand what I'm talking about:
http://i711.photobucket.com/albums/ww117/Piosa/light.jpg

As for folds in clothing, it's a lot easier than you think. Kinetic energies, energy that moves in a direction. When you are drawing, till you get the hang of it, on a separate layer draw arrows pointing away from the inertial force. Example you draw a skirt over a knee, the folds that come off of it will be away from the inertia which is the knee thrusting forward. Draw arrows away from the knee and draw you length. As the energy fades you fold will also thicken. So draw you folds to the end and finish it out.
Same example:
http://i711.photobucket.com/albums/ww117/Piosa/folds.jpg

That is all I have u_u
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 01:19:50 AM by Piosa »

Offline Morgan

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #3: July 10, 2009, 03:05:20 AM»
boring pose, bad lines, bad anatomy, bad shading, hair is really fucking pillow shaded.

i would pay precisely nothing for this

Offline Fox

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #4: July 10, 2009, 05:08:54 AM»
Quote
boring pose, bad lines, bad anatomy, bad shading, hair is really fucking pillow shaded.

i would pay precisely nothing for this
QFE

Also
spell advice right.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 05:10:29 AM by Fox »
Fly me to the moon so I can play among the stars

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #5: July 10, 2009, 08:05:53 AM»
Quote
boring pose, bad lines, bad anatomy, bad shading, hair is really fucking pillow shaded.

i would pay precisely nothing for this
QFE

Also
spell advice right.

boring pose, bad lines, bad anatomy, bad shading, hair is really fucking pillow shaded.

i would pay precisely nothing for this

Obvious trolls are obvious...

Jeez, that's pretty damn cold.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 08:09:34 AM by Piosa »

Offline Tate

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #6: July 10, 2009, 08:10:22 AM»
Quote
boring pose, bad lines, bad anatomy, bad shading, hair is really fucking pillow shaded.

i would pay precisely nothing for this
QFE

Also
spell advice right.

boring pose, bad lines, bad anatomy, bad shading, hair is really fucking pillow shaded.

i would pay precisely nothing for this

Obvious trolls are obvious...

Jeez, that's pretty damn cold.

Except they're right, just not polite. Oh dear~

Offline Hathor

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #7: July 10, 2009, 08:13:14 AM»
I wouldn't be interested in buying this, I am rather picky with premades and rarely buy them anyway, but the quality of this is what turns me off.

What has been said above already points out the big issues, you need to work on your anatomy, study real life photos and anatomy books (go look at the links in Matter's signature, they have helped a lot of us). Here are just a few random pointers;

-The lines on her clothes are really messy, it'd be better if you did patterns and lines a darker shade, or a different colour. That is just my personal pref.

-Be sure to use lots of shades when colouring a remap, I think you at least use more than 3 shades, I can't be sure though, the way you shaded the port, the jpg. and my lack of glasses kinda throws me off. My bad.

-Do you sketch out your image before going straight to line art? A lot of port artists do, whether it be in the 95x95 square or a larger canvas which is later shrunk down to portrait size. Go to DeviantArt and search something along the lines of "port tutorial", "furc port tutorial", there are a lot there, some might help. It will at least show you how others do it.

-For the colouring done on this port, see this tutorial: http://www.derekyu.com/?page_id=218 It explains dithering, which is what I believe you were trying to do? Dithering is not always needed when it comes to ports, it helps smooth out large areas but I know of artists that can make nice ports without dithering. Don't go overboard with it.

-Use finer lines for hair, use the lightest shade for areas closest to the light source. Here is an awesome tutorial that explains it better.

Yes, I do think you should make more, how else will you get better? But I wouldn't go about trying to sell them just yet if I were you.

@Piosa, Morgan is listing what is wrong with the port and posting her opinion, Fox is agreeing with it. That doesn't make them trolls. Keep in mind that xAfflictedAngel said we can be as harsh as we like.
...

IPGD

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #8: July 10, 2009, 08:18:33 AM»
Quote
it bothers me how the clavicles are not defined. (I have a weird clavicle fetish or something, though, so i would automatically favor something with a more defined collar bone. :3)
Unless she is anorexic, the clavicle should be almost invisible in the pose she is in. Her shoulders are rolled back and her neck is leaning forward; the skin would pass over it smoothly. So, no, unless you want her to look like a 60 pound freak, don't define the collarbone.

I'm going to have to make a habit of cleaning up after you, aren't I? >/ A lot of the advice you give is completely erroneous and it'd probably be in your best interest to either research what you say or stop handing out wrong information to artists. It's nice to want to help, but until you actually can help, you are just going to end up doing more harm than good.

Quote
Is there a back light (light that reflects of a surface and bounces off to another surface which reflects light to. Like skin)
For my unnecessary semantics nitpick, that is reflective light, not back lighting. Back lighting is a lighting design technique where the subjects are illuminated from the back; fill lighting is a secondary light source that slightly illuminates shadows (in natural lighting, the sky usually acts as a fill light, adding blue tint to the shadows); and reflective light is a crucial property in the mechanics of light and one of the most important for defining form without lines (but that's a bit of a tangent). Reflective light is always present in some form. See this page on light for more information.

Things I notice about the port:

  • The hair looks like a big floppy turd. You might want define the outsides of the form with black line just for the sake of consistency. The shading is completely illogical and without source; everything is tubular and being illuminated in a conveniently pillow shaded manner. Hair has form, just like any other object.
  • The face is fucked up to hell and back. She looks like a deformed rabbit bee. I don't even know what's going on with that freakish D mouth. This is not what a face looks like. See my signature; both links are probably applicable.
  • The collar is flat. It should follow the rounded shape of the neck, but it instead causes it to look like a thin sheet of paper.
  • Dithering Done Wrong. Block out the form of your shades with solid values before you ease the transitions with dithering. I can't see very well over the jpeging but it looks like you're dithering over the base shade even in the most highlighted areas; this is dumb, and you should be able to plainly see why! I can't really do any edits to show you what I mean because of the jpeging.
  • Don't use black lines in the clothing for detail like that. It looks muddy and awful. Again, the shading of the clothes also shows no attention to the form of the object.

Quote
Obvious trolls are obvious...

Jeez, that's pretty damn cold.
They aren't trolls. Baselessly praising someone's skill actually hurts their ability more in the long run than insulting it, believe it or not!

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #9: July 10, 2009, 08:31:58 AM»
Quote
it bothers me how the clavicles are not defined. (I have a weird clavicle fetish or something, though, so i would automatically favor something with a more defined collar bone. :3)
Unless she is anorexic, the clavicle should be almost invisible in the pose she is in. Her shoulders are rolled back and her neck is leaning forward; the skin would pass over it smoothly. So, no, unless you want her to look like a 60 pound freak, don't define the collarbone.

I'm going to have to make a habit of cleaning up after you, aren't I? >/ A lot of the advice you give is completely erroneous and it'd probably be in your best interest to either research what you say or stop handing out wrong information to artists. It's nice to want to help, but until you actually can help, you are just going to end up doing more harm than good.

Quote
Is there a back light (light that reflects of a surface and bounces off to another surface which reflects light to. Like skin)
For my unnecessary semantics nitpick, that is reflective light, not back lighting. Back lighting is a lighting design technique where the subjects are illuminated from the back; fill lighting is a secondary light source that slightly illuminates shadows (in natural lighting, the sky usually acts as a fill light, adding blue tint to the shadows); and reflective light is a crucial property in the mechanics of light and one of the most important for defining form without lines (but that's a bit of a tangent). Reflective light is always present in some form. See this page on light for more information.

Things I notice about the port:

  • The hair looks like a big floppy turd. You might want define the outsides of the form with black line just for the sake of consistency. The shading is completely illogical and without source; everything is tubular and being illuminated in a conveniently pillow shaded manner. Hair has form, just like any other object.
  • The face is fucked up to hell and back. She looks like a deformed rabbit bee. I don't even know what's going on with that freakish D mouth. This is not what a face looks like. See my signature; both links are probably applicable.
  • The collar is flat. It should follow the rounded shape of the neck, but it instead causes it to look like a thin sheet of paper.
  • Dithering Done Wrong. Block out the form of your shades with solid values before you ease the transitions with dithering. I can't see very well over the jpeging but it looks like you're dithering over the base shade even in the most highlighted areas; this is dumb, and you should be able to plainly see why! I can't really do any edits to show you what I mean because of the jpeging.
  • Don't use black lines in the clothing for detail like that. It looks muddy and awful. Again, the shading of the clothes also shows no attention to the form of the object.

Quote
Obvious trolls are obvious...

Jeez, that's pretty damn cold.
They aren't trolls. Baselessly praising someone's skill actually hurts their ability more in the long run than insulting it, believe it or not!

Thanks for the page. :)

Well I was going by the three to one ratio were you give three complements to every negative. I don't see how making them feel like crap is necessary, unless they have a inflated ego then it wouldn't really harm them at all. I always feel like you get more progress, if you treat someone like dangling a candy bar over a kid's head to get them to clean a room (or slave work). Plus you can't always guarantee a mass improvement over night and I wouldn't want someone to tell me my art looks like suck and fail when I was a beginning artist, I would end up throwing in the towel.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 08:34:13 AM by Piosa »

Offline Tate

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #10: July 10, 2009, 08:42:44 AM»
Here's the candybar: Get better, and no more "harsh" words. People appreciate you.

Brutal honesty isn't making someone feel like shit-it's their soft feelings, and letting the world effect them more than it should. It isn't Matter's or anyone else's job to act as a pillow. That's their own job.

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #11: July 10, 2009, 08:50:16 AM»
Here's the candybar: Get better, and no more "harsh" words. People appreciate you.

Brutal honesty isn't making someone feel like shit-it's their soft feelings, and letting the world effect them more than it should. It isn't Matter's or anyone else's job to act as a pillow. That's their own job.

*sigh*
I can't bring myself to be harsh :(

IPGD

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #12: July 10, 2009, 08:53:06 AM»
Quote
Well I was going by the three to one ratio were you give three complements to every negative.
Haha, wow, yeah, that is completely unnecessary and downright dishonest. There aren't even three good things in this entire picture, much less three for each negative. Here's how you should critique a picture: tell it like it is. If they aren't good, don't tell them they're good. If they aren't bad, don't tell them they're bad. If they are bad, tell them they're bad. If you think they're good, don't say anything about it because there's a chance you're wrong, and even if you're right, it does nothing to help them.

Sugarcoating everything you say does little more than dilute the impact of your message and ultimately does nothing to help the recipient; attitude is more than half the battle of artistic improvement, and an accurate view of your own art is the most valuable thing you could ever have, especially when you are crap. If you don't know you need to improve, how are you going to take the initiative to do so?

Quote
I don't see how making them feel like crap is necessary, unless they have a inflated ego then it wouldn't really harm them at all. I always feel like you get more progress, if you treat someone like dangling a candy bar over a kid's head to get them to clean a room (or slave work).
Praising them doesn't "dangle a candy bar" over their heads. It tells them "you're good, you should be content with your skill level, it's not a pressing priority to improve". You're encouraging artistic stagnation.

Quote
Plus you can't always guarantee a mass improvement over night [...]
Yes you can. A change in attitude is a mass, near instantaneous improvement, and it's the most important one you'll ever make. My goal is not to teach people how to draw, it's to teach people how to teach themselves -- and an accurate evaluation of yourself as an artist is all you need to do that.

Quote
I wouldn't want someone to tell me my art looks like suck and fail when I was a beginning artist, I would end up throwing in the towel.
No you wouldn't. People draw because they like to. At worse, you might quit for a couple weeks, think about what was said, and then come back with a more rational view of your own work. You'll benefit from the encounter in the long run.

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #13: July 10, 2009, 09:17:01 AM»
Quote
Well I was going by the three to one ratio were you give three complements to every negative.
Haha, wow, yeah, that is completely unnecessary and downright dishonest. There aren't even three good things in this entire picture, much less three for each negative. Here's how you should critique a picture: tell it like it is. If they aren't good, don't tell them they're good. If they aren't bad, don't tell them they're bad. If they are bad, tell them they're bad. If you think they're good, don't say anything about it because there's a chance you're wrong, and even if you're right, it does nothing to help them.

Sugarcoating everything you say does little more than dilute the impact of your message and ultimately does nothing to help the recipient; attitude is more than half the battle of artistic improvement, and an accurate view of your own art is the most valuable thing you could ever have, especially when you are crap. If you don't know you need to improve, how are you going to take the initiative to do so?

Quote
I don't see how making them feel like crap is necessary, unless they have a inflated ego then it wouldn't really harm them at all. I always feel like you get more progress, if you treat someone like dangling a candy bar over a kid's head to get them to clean a room (or slave work).
Praising them doesn't "dangle a candy bar" over their heads. It tells them "you're good, you should be content with your skill level, it's not a pressing priority to improve". You're encouraging artistic stagnation.

Quote
Plus you can't always guarantee a mass improvement over night [...]
Yes you can. A change in attitude is a mass, near instantaneous improvement, and it's the most important one you'll ever make. My goal is not to teach people how to draw, it's to teach people how to teach themselves -- and an accurate evaluation of yourself as an artist is all you need to do that.

Quote
I wouldn't want someone to tell me my art looks like suck and fail when I was a beginning artist, I would end up throwing in the towel.
No you wouldn't. People draw because they like to. At worse, you might quit for a couple weeks, think about what was said, and then come back with a more rational view of your own work. You'll benefit from the encounter in the long run.

I hope you don't think I'm arguing, because I'm not. I actually enjoy this conversation it helps me see in different light. It's always nice to talk among other art enthusiasts.

Anyways.... I want to say something but I can't

"Tough Love" is effective in a way but is hurtful. u_u
I have been critiqued by professionals and none were ever "tough." My art mentor was a retired DC comic artist, and I just got my portfolio turned down due to "lack or training in feild" None ever said anything on a personal level, it was hurtful because these were advance artist telling me I wouldn't be where they are without a lot more training, and to the tip of the needle point on what I needed to fix but I always managed to get at least one praise to push me forward. At least that is what I went by, was the small ounce of praise. I can see where you don't think it will help, like if someone was to think "yeah they said my art is AMAZING and I'm a good artist I must not have faults." Inflating ego kind of thing (which I admit I did but I can't bring myself to be "tough") but a little bit of encouragement goes a long way! :)

Now I'm not trying to tell you that your way isn't bad, but I can't bring myself to do it in your way. u_u
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 09:31:21 AM by Piosa »

IPGD

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #14: July 10, 2009, 09:27:49 AM»
Quote
"Tough Love" is effective in a way but is hurtful. u_u
The net sum of benefit from "tough love" vastly outweighs the initial scrape to the ego (which fades, fast). Someone who is regularly exposed to this "tough" critique will become a better artist than one who only gets the sugar candyland critique, so if you look at it that way, you're probably hurting people a lot more by not being mean ::)

It also helps them prepare for the real professional art world, where they are far more honest and brutal than anything that's ever come out of my offensive sewer pit of a mouth.

Quote
I have been critiqued by professionals and none were ever "tough." My art mentor was a retired DC comic artist, and I just got my portfolio turned down due to "lack or training in feild"
You haven't been critiqued by many, then

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #15: July 10, 2009, 09:32:08 AM»
Quote
"Tough Love" is effective in a way but is hurtful. u_u
The net sum of benefit from "tough love" vastly outweighs the initial scrape to the ego (which fades, fast). Someone who is regularly exposed to this "tough" critique will become a better artist than one who only gets the sugar candyland critique, so if you look at it that way, you're probably hurting people a lot more by not being mean ::)

It also helps them prepare for the real professional art world, where they are far more honest and brutal than anything that's ever come out of my offensive sewer pit of a mouth.

Quote
I have been critiqued by professionals and none were ever "tough." My art mentor was a retired DC comic artist, and I just got my portfolio turned down due to "lack or training in feild"
You haven't been critiqued by many, then
I added more ;)
No I know what my faults are and what I need to fix anatomical, coloring, lights, you name it no one is EVER perfect. One year with this art professor who worked in the art field as a designer made me feel like I COULDN'T get anything right. Same with my anatomy teach but he was hot and nice ;P
....Lol so many funny stories with that one...
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 09:38:05 AM by Piosa »

IPGD

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #16: July 10, 2009, 09:49:28 AM»
Quote
I added more ;)
hurf durf

Quote
I have been critiqued by professionals and none were ever "tough." My art mentor was a retired DC comic artist, and I just got my portfolio turned down due to "lack or training in feild" None ever said anything on a personal level, it was hurtful because these were advance artist telling me I wouldn't be where they are without a lot more training, and to the tip of the needle point on what I needed to fix but I always managed to get at least one praise to push me forward. At least that is what I went by, was the small ounce of praise. I can see where you don't think it will help, like if someone was to think "yeah they said my art is AMAZING and I'm a good artist I must not have faults." Inflating ego kind of thing (which I admit I did but I can't bring myself to be "tough") but a little bit of encouragement goes a long way! :)
If you learned to not be so personally attached to your art, you wouldn't even need that encouragement. I know I'm shit, I'm embarrassed just to look at my own art, but I know where I'm going and what I need to do to get there. I know I will, in some distant future, be good at what I do. As someone who has been both a shitty animutard completely ignorant to its own failure, and later skittish, uncertain and dependent on praise, it's much better this way.

If you want to encourage people, "artistic skill is not Excalibur; your goal of X is easily accessible, you can get there by doing Y" is a much better motivator than "you did a great job woo woo!!!!" I'm not telling you you have to be mean, but being dishonest in a way that isn't constructive isn't helpful even if you intend for it to be.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2009, 09:51:04 AM by Matter »

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #17: July 10, 2009, 10:02:39 AM»
Quote
I added more ;)
hurf durf

Quote
I have been critiqued by professionals and none were ever "tough." My art mentor was a retired DC comic artist, and I just got my portfolio turned down due to "lack or training in feild" None ever said anything on a personal level, it was hurtful because these were advance artist telling me I wouldn't be where they are without a lot more training, and to the tip of the needle point on what I needed to fix but I always managed to get at least one praise to push me forward. At least that is what I went by, was the small ounce of praise. I can see where you don't think it will help, like if someone was to think "yeah they said my art is AMAZING and I'm a good artist I must not have faults." Inflating ego kind of thing (which I admit I did but I can't bring myself to be "tough") but a little bit of encouragement goes a long way! :)
If you learned to not be so personally attached to your art, you wouldn't even need that encouragement. I know I'm shit, I'm embarrassed just to look at my own art, but I know where I'm going and what I need to do to get there. I know I will, in some distant future, be good at what I do. As someone who has been both a shitty animutard completely ignorant to its own failure, and later skittish, uncertain and dependent on praise, it's much better this way.

If you want to encourage people, "artistic skill is not Excalibur; your goal of X is easily accessible, you can get there by doing Y" is a much better motivator than "you did a great job woo woo!!!!" I'm not telling you you have to be mean, but being dishonest in a way that isn't constructive isn't helpful even if you intend for it to be.

Yeah your right thank you, but what meant when I said about the encouragement is that a way more better artist than I will ever be in the world!! Has told me that he thinks something looks good I had that small ounce to impress him maybe if I work harder than I can wow him next time, kind of encouragement.

I totally agree, my art is total suck I DON'T think myself better THAN ANYONE. I need a crap load of improvement, my color is total crap, my anatomy needs work whether it be my realism or my cartoons, I totally agree with you on that. I wasn't trying to argue by any means WHAT SO EVER. In fact it was really cool getting to know you, I was more or less telling you how I did it or how I see it. However as far as the internet goes I am new to this internet art community, or any. The anonymity must help out a lot because no one knows you or who you are it's better to get a point across such as critiquing. Not in the way I would deem it but you have been on here longer than I have so if it works than so be it. :)

Next time I critique I will have sound fact to back me up and be a lot less sugar coating. BTW nice sig.

Offline Narnia

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #18: July 10, 2009, 12:50:34 PM»
If you want to discuss styles of critique.. It's probably best to start a new thread elsewhere.
"The views expressed in this message are mine alone and do not necessarily reflect those of the Furcadia Art Zone, Dragon's Eye Production, or Furcadia."

Offline Suzy

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #19: July 10, 2009, 04:24:52 PM»
If you want to discuss styles of critique.. It's probably best to start a new thread elsewhere.
Someone please do, that sounds interesting. I'd like to watch that.

I really should stop giving critiques, though. I did some research and yes, Matter is correct. The collarbone should not be defined. It's sort of confusing to me though, because I weigh about 97 pounds at 5' 3", so basically I'm too damn tiny and bones tend to show more on me. No convenient reference for me~

Offline Morgan

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #20: July 10, 2009, 04:44:33 PM»
If you want to discuss styles of critique.. It's probably best to start a new thread elsewhere.
Someone please do, that sounds interesting. I'd like to watch that.

I really should stop giving critiques, though. I did some research and yes, Matter is correct. The collarbone should not be defined. It's sort of confusing to me though, because I weigh about 97 pounds at 5' 3", so basically I'm too damn tiny and bones tend to show more on me. No convenient reference for me~

while we're still off topic:
eat some food holy shit

IPGD

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #21: July 10, 2009, 04:46:15 PM»
Quote
If you want to discuss styles of critique.. It's probably best to start a new thread elsewhere.
I think the argument's over >.>

Quote
Someone please do, that sounds interesting. I'd like to watch that.
Hrgghhhh no. I would be pretty much the only person arguing, and if you want to know what I think about it, I've made a billion posts explaining what I do and why I do it. Despite how much I end up doing it, I don't particularly enjoy repeating myself

Offline Suzy

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #22: July 10, 2009, 05:14:22 PM»
If you want to discuss styles of critique.. It's probably best to start a new thread elsewhere.
Someone please do, that sounds interesting. I'd like to watch that.

I really should stop giving critiques, though. I did some research and yes, Matter is correct. The collarbone should not be defined. It's sort of confusing to me though, because I weigh about 97 pounds at 5' 3", so basically I'm too damn tiny and bones tend to show more on me. No convenient reference for me~

while we're still off topic:
eat some food holy shit

I eat like a pig and I'm still tiny. I have an unrealistically fast metabolism. (I gained a pound this year. :>)

Offline binkari

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #23: July 11, 2009, 10:26:23 AM»
Also
spell advice right.

This just in: "critique" and "advise" are also verbs.

More news at 11.

EDIT: Also, what's up with OPs that post a thread and then never bother responding to it?
« Last Edit: July 11, 2009, 10:27:59 AM by binkari »

Offline Piosa

Re: Critique and advise?
«Reply #24: July 11, 2009, 12:39:50 PM»
If you want to discuss styles of critique.. It's probably best to start a new thread elsewhere.

Someone please do, that sounds interesting. I'd like to watch that.

I really should stop giving critiques, though. I did some research and yes, Matter is correct. The collarbone should not be defined. It's sort of confusing to me though, because I weigh about 97 pounds at 5' 3", so basically I'm too damn tiny and bones tend to show more on me. No convenient reference for me~

while we're still off topic:
eat some food holy shit

I eat like a pig and I'm still tiny. I have an unrealistically fast metabolism. (I gained a pound this year. :>)
me too