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Author Topic: Critique on portrait  (Read 1391 times)

Offline Shannon

Critique on portrait
«: November 26, 2009, 05:05:55 PM»
Hiya

I was wondering what people think about my shading. This is the 'new' style and I think I improved..

It is not about the helmet cause I know it is crappy, but I am talking about the fur etc.



Thanks.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2010, 03:35:45 PM by Shannon »
Furcadia: Revilian, Tibet, Kumal, Lad

 
        

Offline Morgan

Re: Critique on portrait
«Reply #1: November 27, 2009, 12:22:37 AM»
pillow shading is a no-no. please to be learning how light works, and don't go with colored lineart until you know how to do it right.

Offline Shannon

Re: Critique on portrait
«Reply #2: November 27, 2009, 04:40:53 PM»
pillow shading is a no-no. please to be learning how light works, and don't go with colored lineart until you know how to do it right.

You first need to practise..
Furcadia: Revilian, Tibet, Kumal, Lad

Offline Sync

Re: Critique on portrait
«Reply #3: November 27, 2009, 04:54:13 PM»
doesn't make it any better, even if you are practicing.

there's a clear difference between was morgan is telling you and what you are doing.

is what you are doing.


is what you should be doing.

images from this, which includes a more detailed explanation on what we're talking about.: http://www.natomic.com/hosted/marks/mpat/shading.html

and i also agree with morgan on the colored lineart. the way you've done it here is really poorly done and flattens the image even more. the really light lines are extremely distracting, but you probably did that just because the wolf would blend into the background too much if you did not. just use a black outline, make it simple.

EDIT:
just another visible reference from the site
« Last Edit: November 27, 2009, 04:57:51 PM by Sync »

Offline Shannon

Re: Critique on portrait
«Reply #4: November 29, 2009, 09:14:28 AM»
doesn't make it any better, even if you are practicing.

there's a clear difference between was morgan is telling you and what you are doing.

is what you are doing.


is what you should be doing.

images from this, which includes a more detailed explanation on what we're talking about.: http://www.natomic.com/hosted/marks/mpat/shading.html

and i also agree with morgan on the colored lineart. the way you've done it here is really poorly done and flattens the image even more. the really light lines are extremely distracting, but you probably did that just because the wolf would blend into the background too much if you did not. just use a black outline, make it simple.

EDIT:
just another visible reference from the site


Thanks. This is what I needed to know. Tell me that I do pillow shading is fine, but the better way is to give me tips :D I appreciate it.
About the lighter outline, its ment to glow or something xD But thatdidnt really work out :P
Furcadia: Revilian, Tibet, Kumal, Lad

Offline Shannon

Re: Critique on portrait
«Reply #5: March 29, 2010, 03:36:15 PM»
added my latest port.
Furcadia: Revilian, Tibet, Kumal, Lad

Offline Rex T-Rex

Re: Critique on portrait
«Reply #6: March 30, 2010, 10:20:53 AM»
The shading is still rather... random. It doesn't really depict the light source at all and it doesn't give a "fur" appearance. If anything it kinda looks like stuffed animal stuffing (the course almost fiberglass like kind) was dragged in a washer. Also, keep in mind that not ever part of any animal has the same fur type/length. The fur on the snout of a wolf/dog is short and fairly uniform is design (o random "detailing"). http://www.nashoba.k12.ok.us/wolf-photo.jpg
Depending on the fur of your creature other parts may be different. A typical wolf has medium fur on its head but it doesn't stick up, it lays flat. When you get to the neck is can be "fluffier" but don't do random shading. See his neck? http://vanessaleighsblog.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/gray_wolf.jpg
The neck fur will really only stick out and separate into sections like that when the neck is stretched but it's easy to tell that it is longer.
http://howlingforjustice.files.wordpress.com/2009/10/wolf11.jpg Here it is in a natural position.  You can see how the fur is "fluffier" here but not super ridiculous fluffy. You can also see that the nap of the fur is in a downward direction (fur flows pointing downward).  Nap is very important when getting the right look to realistic fur. Snout nap is going up towards the eyes until you reach just before the nose, then is points down to the nose. On the head the nap is away and back (it radiates out to the ends). Nap pretty much continues to flow "down" for the rest of the body. Remember though that for the back and main portion of torso it isn't directly down but rather flowing towards the tail. The best way to get it right is to study real life examples, photos will do you pretty well but if you have a dog I suggest looking at and examining it so you can understand how fur behaves. Also BIG NOTE about the EARS.  Do NOT do random shading that looks exactly like it does everywhere else on the ears. Ear fur is flat, but  it can be longer and silky or short (ears can often have a bit of a soft shine to them). The important thin is that the ear fur lay flat to maintain the look of the ear being very thin. Remember, canines have thin ears. http://www.organic-pet-digest.com/image-files/dog-ear-infection-5.jpg
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