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Author Topic: why commissioned art is never what you thought it would be?  (Read 1504 times)

Offline LSD

http://www.gnu.org/philosophy/motivation.html

scientific evidence. you can thank me later.

discuss.

 
        


Offline Suzy

Re: why commissioned art is never what you thought it would be?
«Reply #2: December 12, 2009, 07:16:41 PM»
http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_pink_on_motivation.html

That's interesting.

I think this topic isn't getting very much discussion because admitting the truth to all this can make an artist look lazy. Since I don't take any serious commissions, I don't give a shit, so here's what I think. Artists who get a lot of commissions know that people will continue to pay for the stuff that isn't 100% of their effort. So, as long as people will pay for less effort, why bother?

It's like Matter and now many others say; furries will buy anything.

Offline binkari

Re: why commissioned art is never what you thought it would be?
«Reply #3: December 12, 2009, 10:21:21 PM»
It's not necessarily a question of laziness, it's often a matter of how your creativity is suddenly limited when you're working with someone else's idea. Commissions often leave the artist feeling that they have to meet a quota, that there's some invisible boundary that they can't cross, so many of them just play it safe and the piece falls sort of what either of them may have expected. There is the deepseated fear that you'll mess something up, that your vision doesn't match your commissioner's, even when they tell you to "have fun with it."

With personal work (and to some extent, gift art), the only expectations you have to meet are your own. It's an incredibly liberating feeling, and one that a lot of professional artists appreciate.

Offline LSD

Re: why commissioned art is never what you thought it would be?
«Reply #4: December 15, 2009, 07:24:23 AM»
It's not necessarily a question of laziness, it's often a matter of how your creativity is suddenly limited when you're working with someone else's idea. Commissions often leave the artist feeling that they have to meet a quota, that there's some invisible boundary that they can't cross, so many of them just play it safe and the piece falls sort of what either of them may have expected. There is the deepseated fear that you'll mess something up, that your vision doesn't match your commissioner's, even when they tell you to "have fun with it."

With personal work (and to some extent, gift art), the only expectations you have to meet are your own. It's an incredibly liberating feeling, and one that a lot of professional artists appreciate.
this

Offline Maryvic

Re: why commissioned art is never what you thought it would be?
«Reply #5: December 15, 2009, 06:50:26 PM»
I'm pretty much a dud here, but my best work has gone towards others and not myself.

Sounds like a whore to me.

 

anything